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Courtnix Quail
We start a new flock each spring with our school hatch program. The eggs are speckle-tacular and hatch in 17 days. They also begin to lay in just 6 weeks with a small tasty treat for any gourmet palate. The males are very easy to distinguish from the females as there are no speckles on the breast feathers of the males. Sometimes we get a pure white bird and we need to wait until they show mating signs to know if it's a boy or girl.

Welsummer Chickens
We love our deep rust-coloured Welsummer hens. Eggs from these purebred birds are very large, dark brown and can have small darker brown spots.

Silkie Chickens
Looking more like fur than feathers, the bearded Silkie is fuzz all over. They are a breed from Asia and are known for their black skin under the feathers, no matter if the covering is white, brown or black. We've had several of these bantam or miniature feathered friends on the farm and love the interesting comb and their teenager like crazy hair do!

Bantam Cochin Chickens
A fluffy bird if ever there was! Bantam means miniature and these birds are of Asian descent. Ours are black, blue or "splash" in colour with red single combs. They have fully feathered feet and are a fancy but docile breed. Our lead rooster is named Darth Vader.

Porcelain D'Uccle Chickens
Another bantam breed joined with new feathered friends in time for Mother's Day.
This breed has lovely cream and pale grey feathers, outlined or spangled in beige and grey. You will find fully feathered legs and a single red comb. We continue to breed these lovely colours.

Mille Fleur D'Uccle Chickens
A different colour pattern, this bantam is booted (feathers down to the toes) and bearded (with tufts at the cheeks) with copper feathers. Accents include black and white speckles and spots. This compliments our Porcelain and we cross breed them to keep the colours unique.

Americauna Chickens … Easter Eggers
There is a large variety of colour in these birds but the eggs are the fun part - from bright turquoise to pale blue, the eggs are always the same shade from the same bird. We love picking them from the nest each morning to see the variety of egg colours in our basket.

Olive Eggers
What do you get when you cross a turquoise egg layer with a brown egg layer? An Olive Egger F1! (first generation). It's a khaki coloured egg with the chicken feathering dependant on the parent stock - it can be solid or patterned.
Cross an F1 back to a brown egg layer for a deeper green the next generation.
AH, Chicken genetics is a fun lesson for young farmers. Why didn't they teach this instead of fruit flies in High School?

Turkens - Naked Neck Chickens
We adopted one and hatched another of these unique birds. Like the name states, there are no feathers on the entire neck of this bird and so they resemble a vulture or turkey. What do you think? Cute & Cuddlie or Needs-Lots-Of-Loving? And no scarf required for the cold Canadian winters, they are hearty! No matter what they look like, they are well cared for at Woolley Wonderland Farm … and the eggs? Delicious for breakfast and baking!

Buff and Golden Laced Polish
With funky crest (hair) topping the head, we adore these medium sized, white egg layers. Lovely disposition and such lookers! They are black with golden outlines on the feathers. Karl the rooster has copper hackles with Brigit and Brigitta as his mates.

Hens @ Home Program
Click here to discover ... sold out for 2018!

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